‘The Two of Us’ radio show on catch-up

Interviews, Mental Health, Other Lives, Politics

In the Reels Rebels Radio show ‘The Two of Us’ I talk to writers and artists  from all disciplines about their work and how it relates to mental health/emotional well-being. For this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week (14 – 20 May) we have four very different guests on ’The Two of Us’ featuring Khairani Barokka, S.V. Berlin, Diane Goldie and Joan Woddis. You can also enjoy some of the other guests I’ve had on my show – namely Joelle Taylor, Miriam Nash and S.K. Perry.

Joan Woddis publicity

Diane publicityJoelle publicity catch upKhatun publicity CATCH UPMiriam publicity CATCH UPOkka publicity catch upSK Perry publicity catch up

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‘The Two of Us’ May 2018

Interviews, Other Lives, Radio

May publicity small

In ‘The Two of Us’ on Reels Rebels Radio writer and photographer Naomi Woddis talks to artists, musicians and writers from all disciplines about their work and how it relates to mental health/emotional well-being. For this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week (14 – 20 May) we have four very different guests on ’The Two of Us’ featuring Khairani Barokka, S.V. Berlin, Diane Goldie and Joan Woddis.

 

 

Bringing Art Home – an interview with photographer Supriya Sunneva Kolandavelu

Interviews, Photography

I decided it was time to interview some photographers and find out what drives them to take pictures, Supriya Sunneva Kolandavelu, who brings to her work such a fresh and generous eye, talks about her own photographic journey.
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What or who got you in to taking photographs and did you ever study it ?

My wonderful friend Craig Thomas, who is himself a self taught photographer, is a big inspiration for me. I borrowed a camera from a friend and later met up with Craig after getting Skype counselling on how to work with a camera. Craig was fast and eager to get me on track. He shared with me his wisdom about photography as well as taking me on several ‘at home with Craig and on the road’ workshops where he taught me what he could get into my stubborn mind. From there I was able to practice photography on a professional level. I have always had the eye but perhaps lacked the instrument to practice it until the last two years.

What sparks your imagination and inspires you ?

I think influences are all around me. I do believe that not only do I detect happiness through my own happy heart, but also evoke situations around me in which mirror my present mode, being happy. The same goes for sadness. When I feel sad and uncomfortable, I will in the same way provoke situations around me, so that I can have the space to express that feeling. I think that in order to express sadness, and relate in that way to other people’s sadness, I have to allow the sadness to take me over. If I want to provoke happiness, I will have to provoke it within myself first.

Seeing the World – an interview with photographer Rob Covell

Interviews, Photography

I decided it was time to interview some photographers and find out what drives them to take pictures. Below is an interview with my friend Rob Covell. Rob has a deep humanity in him and an abhorrence of social injustice. As well as his great work I also admire him for sticking to his principles which he talks about in more detail here.
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What or who got you in to taking photographs and did you ever study it ? 

There have been a few factors, and I guess I don’t really explore the reasons until you ask me like that. 4 years ago I went to the Caribbean with my partner and took a cheap bridge camera and I couldn’t stop taking pics. That certainly sparked an underlying need for me to take photos. A year later I saw some beautiful photos on Flickr of a model, and I just thought how I’d like to take shots of my partner like that. The bridge camera was not allowing me to take control of the photos, so I bought an entry level DSLR. I’m self-taught plus whatever info I can cadge off other photographers.

Divine Symmetry – an interview with photographer Craig Thomas

Interviews, Photography

I decided it was time to interview some photographers and find out what drives them to take pictures. Below my good friend, Vermont based photographer, Craig Thomas shares what inspires him.

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What or who got you in to taking photographs and did you ever study it ?

I am self taught and got into it after a great catastrophe. I find it very healing. I had been used to working in groups and am very highly motivated, I find the solitude of photography much more appealing and it also makes me much more effective in my output.

What sparks your imagination and inspires you ?

I find classical arts very inspiring – my work seems to fit the music of Beethoven, Vivaldi, Bach et al. I am trying to achieve a similar ‘epic’ quality in my own work. I am also heavily influenced by the arcane arts. My research into divine symmetry has led me to the world of alchemy, hermetics, science and ancient cultures.

What projects are you working on now ?

Right now I am working on a book out here in Vermont, I have collected a large body of work on my three year journey. Now that i find myself in a new country with a new life it will be helpful for me to have a way to show people ‘the best of’. I love displaying my work in print more than any other medium.

Film or digital ?

Digital for work as it makes life very easy and inexpensive but ultimately film is the master, nothing beats it.

What matters most to you, how a photo looks or how it how it makes you feel ? I was watching an interview with Nan Goldin the other day and she said, unsurprisingly, that when she was shooting it was all about how she felt. The composition and artistry was the second stage, when she got the negatives back. In a sense she gets in very close and then removes herself.

I have no attachment to the work i create itself, to me it’s the innate nature of being a photographer – collecting flattened moments of a reality distilled through my own thoughts and feelings. If a photo gets stolen take a better shot. If I lost all my work somehow, shoot it all again. I find that my ability and perspective increases rapidly so i often go back an re-edit work.

As for actual shooting, it’s all about the knowing and the trust that I’m letting the events infront of my camera unfold. Framing for me is important but there is also a moment in time that I’m looking to capture. That’s the moment when my subject let’s their guard down for that split second.

Can photography heal ?

For me photography has created the single greatest healing experience I have had, and continues to do so. I found that reviewing my work gives me a great sense of where I was at at the time of shooting. I then remember the story of the shoot itself, so as well as analysing my work I can also analyse myself at the same time. I find the more at peace I am with myself the better my work. These two things are congruent in creating focussed and strong work.

Finally, please complete this sentence ‘I love taking photographs because…..

…it helps me answer questions in a way that nothing else can.